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Our Antique Doll Collection

Rain for their crops is essential for survival.   Throughout the summer season ceremonies and dances are performed by Hopi's dressed as "spirit"  beings called Katsina's (Kachinas).  These dancers are thought of as spiritual messengers who convey the wishes of the Hopi people through prayers, songs and dances. Katsina is the spelling preferred by the Hopi, and Kachina is the spelling most often found in the English literature.

Katsina dolls are life - like images or carvings called "TIHU" by the Hopis.  These are made to be presented to the Hopi girls as an educational medium, to teach them about the Hopi beliefs, customs, and ceremonies. 

The Katsina doll is not a toy, it is a accurate image of the live Katsina dancer.  They are carved and painted from the soft roots of the Cottonwood tree.

The Hopi Indian Katsina doll is probably the most unique and colorful of any Native Art expression in the world today.

Here we have a set of 26 Beautiful Pieces of Native American Katsina's (Kachina) Doll's.  This antique collection is available but only as a complete set. They are from the 60's - 70's - 80's.
Please contact us if you would like to purchase this set.
Price for this complete  Katsina Carving Collection: $6000.00
Please contact us directly to purchase this set and for shipping costs.

Click on any thumbnail for a larger view

C1BL - 12" Bear Katsina by Barbara Talahytewa. 
The bear katsina appears alone or in a group. He is known to have special healing powers. The bear katsina is of such great strength that it is felt he can cure the sick.
C1BR - 13" Nuvak' China or Snow Katsina
by E. Talahytewa.
The Snow Katsina appears in many Hopi dances such as the Powamu, Kiva Dances, Water Serpent Ceremony, and Mixed Katsina Dances. Presumably he lives on top the San Francisco Peaks and helps to bring the cold and the snows of winter to the Hopi.
C1TC - 16" Yo-we or Priest Killer Katsina
By Joe LaCapa Jr.
In the late 1600's the Hopis rebelled against the Spanish priests at the same time as the Pueblos along the Rio Grande, but in contrast to the eastern group the Hopis were never reconquered. Yo-we is thought to be the Katsina that killed the priest at Oraibi during the revolt. He grabbed for the priest's girl friend but succeeded only in tearing off one Earring's, which is why this Katsina always appears with a single earring.
C1TL - 15" Hemis Katsina, Jemez or Ripened Corn Katsina.
By Skaten
The Hemis Katsina is most often used for the Niman or Home-Going Ceremony when the Katsinas leave for six months. It is one of the most appropriate Katsinas for this farewell as it is the first Katsina to bring mature corn to the people, indicating that the corn crop is assured.
C1TR - 14" Wuayk-Kuita, Broad Face Katsina (Guard Katsina)
by Artist Poleyeapuma
The Broad-Face Katsina is the most typical form of guard, as he appears in the Bean Dance on all three mesas. On First Mesa he comes with Soyoko during the Powamu, while on the Second and Third he guards the procession during Bean Dance Ceremony. He brings up the rear and keeps everyone moving forward together.
C2BL - 12" Masau'u or Ghost Katsina, Earth God Katsina (has a short note written by the artist about the Katsina between the legs. With the artist name & address.) By Stacy Talahytewa.
Stacy Talahytewa provided the family income by selling his carved dolls. He carves arms and legs separately, glues them to the body of the carved doll and adorns the heads with chicken or turkey feathers. He inspired his children who have become Kachina carvers also.  Masau'u is the deity who controls both the surface of the earth and the Underworld. In his capacity as ruler of the of the earth, he gave the Hopi their lands and bade them honor him with prayer plumes when they traveled the land. as god of death he controls the passage of the dead into the Underworld and the movement of Katsinas emerging from the netherland into the world of living through the kivas..
C2BR - 12" Omau'u Katsina, Cloud Katsina
By Paul F. Coochyamptewa.
The Omau'u Katsina formerly appeared in the Mixed Dances. For some reason this Katsina has dropped in popularity since the part of this century and is now virtually uknown. the doll appears only in the older collections.
C2TC - 14" Ahola Katsina By Albert Silas.
Ahola Katsina is an important chief Katsina for both the First and Second Mesa as he opens the Powamu ceremony with Kiva performance on the first night. This performance seems to involve mimetic magic to slow the passage of the sun. At a shrine in the "Gap" of the First Mesa the next day an additional rite is performed as the sun rises. With daybreak Ahul (or Ahola) and Powamu Chief deposit pahos (prayer feathers) at Katsina spring, for he is the ancient one of the Katsina Clan.
C2TL - 13" Nuvak' China or Snow Katsina
by E. Talahytewa.
The Snow Katsina appears in many Hopi dances such as the Powamu, Kiva Dances, Water Serpent Ceremony, and Mixed Katsina Dances. Presumably he lives on top the San Francisco Peaks and helps to bring the cold and the snows of winter to the Hopi.
C2TR - 13" Nangasohu Katsina, Chasing Star or Meteor Katsina
By George E. Pooley.
According to some Hopi this Katsina represents a planet but to many others it is a meteor that is the Chasing Star. The Katsina wears an enormous head dress of trailing eagle feathers, carries a yucca whip and a bell and appears in pairs.
C3BL - SOLD
C3BR - 8" Omau'u Katsina, Cloud Katsina
By Lyle Lomayma .
The Omau'u Katsina formerly appeared in the Mixed Dances. For some reason this Katsina has dropped in popularity since the part of this century and is now virtually unknown. the doll appears only in the older collections.
C3TC - 12" Hu', Tungwup, Whipper Katsina
By George E. Pooley.
The Hu' Katsinas appear before the actual Bean Dance Parade to initiate the children into the Katsina Cult. They always come as a pair and accompany the Crow Mother who holds their whips for them. As each child is brought forward to stand before them they strike four solid blows across their backs with the yucca whips, taking turns at the task until all have received this treatment.
C3TL - 10" Hu', Tungwup, Whipper Katsina
By Augustine Komolestewa .
The Hu' Katsinas appear before the actual Bean Dance Parade to initiate the children into the Katsina Cult. They always come as a pair and accompany the Crow Mother who holds their whips for them. As each child is brought forward to stand before them they strike four solid blows across their backs with the yucca whips, taking turns at the task until all have received this treatment.
C3TR - 12" Kokopelli Hump-backed Flute Player "Kokopolo" By R. S. Pentewa "1976".
This is one of the most popular and best known of all the Hopi Katsina dolls. He is also one of the most easily recognized because of the hump on his back. His black mask has whit pot hook eyes and a whit stripe painted over the top. A conical beak pointing up gives him a definite phallic appearance. In real life, the bill or beak is made of twisted corn Kokopelli Hump-backed Flute Player "Kokopolo"n husks.
C4B1 - 3 1/2" Mudhead, Koyemsi Katsina By Skalon.
The Koyemsi is a multi-faceted clown introduce form the Zuni. the may appear as a chorus, and on First Mesa and possibly other villages their songs are in Zuni. During the rest of the in a dance they may engage in games with the boys and girls in the audience. At other times only a single Mudhead may appear as drummer for a group.
C4B2 - 4" Mudhead Koyemsi by Unknown The Mudhead is a multi-faceted clown introduce from the Zuni. The Mudhead may appear as a chorus, and on First Mesa and possibly other villages, their songs are in Zuni. During the rest of the dance they may engage in games with the boys and girls in the audience. At other times only a single Mudhead may appear as drummer for a group.
C4B3 - 8" Corn Katsina By E Pooley.
Corn Katsina's are the most common of the plant impersonators. This tihu is covered with spots that represent kernels of corn. The Corn Katsina appear during winter kiva dances and springtime plaza dances. Several types of Corn Katsina represent the different varieties of corn given as presents during during performances.
C4B4 - 8" Honan, Badger Katsina By Stacy Talahytewa.
Stacy Talahytewa provided the family income by selling his carved dolls. He carves arms and legs separately, glues them to the body of the carved doll and adorns the heads with chicken or turkey feathers. He inspired his children who have become Kachina carvers also. The Honan or Badger Katsina is more often seen during the Mixed Dances on Third Mesa or the Water Serpent Ceremony on First Mesa than during the Powamu.
C4B5 - 7" Kona or Chipmunk Katsina By O. Jackson.
The Chipmunk carries yucca whips with which to urge onward anyone who races against him. Should thy win he gives them prizes of yellow and red piki bread.
C4B6 - 8" Lagan or Squirrel Katsina By George Pooley.
The Squirrel Katsina appears on all three mesas but has two rather distinct forms. During the Kiva Dances in winter he is supposed to challenge any woman to take from him anything that she thinks worth having.
C4T1 - 8" Aya, or Tuskiapaya, Rattle or Crazy Rattle Runner Katsina By Elidia Chapella
The Crazy Rattle Runner carry yucca which they use on any race who loses, to give several hard swats. If, however, the man should win, he will be given piki bread.
C4T2 - 8" Awatovi Ogre Man Katsina By W. M. Bill Satala The ogre is an important from the village of Awatovi, destroyed early in the 1700s and the survivors taken to the Hopi villages of today. the Awatovi Soyok' Taka behaves almost exactly like the Wiharu or White Nataska and is probably a variant of that Katsina. The Soyok' Taka stands at the side during the ordeal of the children, stamping and grumbling, with a large basket ready and waiting on its back.
C4T3 - 8" Koshari Clown Katsina, Paiyakyamu, Hano Clown, Glutton By No Artist Available
The multiple names of this clown give some indication of his origin. Koshari or variants of them may be found in most of the pueblos. They are figures that are both sacred and profane. Their actions while highly amusing are not what the Hopi or anyone else would like to be caught doing in public.
C4T4 - 8" Mudhead, Koyemsi Katsina
By Lyle Lomayma. "1986"
The Koyemsi is a multi-faceted clown introduce form the Zuni. the may appear as a chorus, and on First Mesa and possibly other villages their songs are in Zuni. During the rest of the in a dance they may engage in games with the boys and girls in the audience. At other times only a single Mudhead may appear as drummer for a group.
C4T5 - 9" Sipikne, many other names, Zuni Warrior Katsina By Elidia Chapella .
This Katsina, an import from Zuni, is undergoing a gradual transformation into a more Hopi form of Katsina through slight innovations which change the original figure. Formerly the sipikne came with not rattles at all and danced furiously in complete silence, but of recent sleigh bell have been added to his costume. He comes in all of directional colors and is a favorite of the Katsina Carvers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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